3 Ways Traveling Can Be Physically and Emotionally Rehabilitative

Working 40+ hours a week, 52 weeks a year is physically and mentally demanding. Most employers offer vacation days to aide in the recuperation of the mind and help increase work performance and efficiency in employees. But in the last decade alone, full-time employees haven’t been taking their allotted amount of days off. Because vacation is meant to rejuvenate the mind, body, and soul of an employee, when these days aren’t taken, they can add to deteriorating health. So to show you just how important traveling for a vacation can be, here are three ways traveling can be physically and emotionally rehabilitative.

Decreases Stress Levels

Planning a trip or vacation can sometimes be stressful. Having to plan activities, where to eat, and what things to do on certain days can all add to increased stress while planning a trip. However, Chris Erskine, a contributor of the LA Times, states that in a 2013 study, stress levels decrease by almost 90% within the first few days of starting a vacation. Along with low stress levels, people have also seen low levels of depression due to traveling. Less stress can also lead to lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels, improving your physical health.

Boosts the Immune System

Traveling to foreign places exposes your body to new and different bacteria. Mary Ruebush, a doctor and contributor to Experience Life, shares a study about how exposure to dirt, bacteria, and minor illnesses can help our immune system grow stronger. She relates this to an athlete’s body: to grow, the body needs training and practice. No matter what the situation, whether you’re traveling or attending a birthday party, people are always very conscious about germs. The good thing is, coming into contact with said bacteria and grime helps build antibodies to fight off illnesses, which in turn boosts the immune system.

Helps with Brain Growth

Not only will traveling help to clear the mind, but it can also help grow it as well. Throwing yourself into an unfamiliar environment forces the brain, and you, to adapt as quickly as possible. Emily Holland, a contributor to The Chopra Center, talks about a few different scientific studies regarding how travel affects the brain. One study has shown that when you’re having to adapt to new surroundings, synapses in the brain can spark, ultimately enhancing creativity; with this, comes growth. Josh Noel, a contributor to the Chicago Tribune, states that the benefits traveling has on your mind have also been shown to help fight off diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Busy lives and schedules can hinder planning vacations, but hopefully these health benefits from traveling can help influence your desire to take a well-deserved trip.

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